The Long Road Home Omnibus

the-long-road-homeI’ve been somewhat lax in my Dark Tower re-read of late, mainly due to the operation and subsequent recovery. I’m only just starting to get up to speed on everything, and almost up-to-date on the backlog of reviews. As for this one, well, The Long Road Home was a good story, and a great first original comic run – you can check out my full review at SFFWorld. Looking forward to the next one.

The Long Road Home continues events immediately following The Gunslinger Born, with Roland, Cuthbert, and Alain heading back to Gilead with Maerlyn’s Grapefruit, a magical orb that can have very adverse effects on those who become obsessed with it. With the death of Susan Delgado, Roland is struggling to deal with this loss, and Maerlyn’s Grapefruit only adds to the woes of the ka-tet as Roland enters its depths, leaving his body in a coma while they are chased by a posse from Mejis. While within the realm of the Grapefruit, Roland must fight for his very sanity in order to return to the world of the living…

The Gunslinger Born Omnibus

the-gunslinger-bornI decided last week that 2017 would be the year I read & re-read Stephen King’s Dark Tower universe. I’ve read all the books, though it’s a few years since I last immersed myself in them, but haven’t read all the comics/graphic novels that are set within this milieu. The Gunslinger Born is the first of these – one I did read way back in 2007/8 – and it’s good to revisit it once again. A great starting place for my journey, that’s for sure. Head on over to SFFWorld to see my full review!

The Dark Tower is Stephen King’s Magnum Opus, a seven book series that follows gunslinger Roland Deschain on his quest after the Man in Black, and then onwards to the Dark Tower. While the core books focus specifically on Roland’s quest, there are other stories the fit into this milieu:The Little Sisters of Eluria, a novella set before the events of the first book, The Gunslinger; and The Wind Through the Keyhole, a novel within a novel, set prior to the fifth book, Wolves of the Calla. And, of course, there is the focus of this review: the comic book series published by Marvel and with input from King.

The other main aspect that I must talk about is the art. Not only is it fantastic in its own right, it fits in perfectly with both the setting and story. Jae Lee and Richard Isanove have excelled, each page presenting such a fitting portrayal of characters and events. In this omnibus edition there is also bonus artwork included – the alternate and deviant covers for each of the issues – and it’s a great addition to an already excellent collection.

Reading Stephen King Update #2

I’d hoped to read one Stephen King book per month this year, but have failed on that up to now. I’ve managed 6 more – Firestarter, The Dead Zone, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, End of Watch, From A Buick 8, Misery – and would like to try and make up the months I missed before the end of the year. I think Misery is one of my favourites yet.

Any idea on the next I should read? Continue reading “Reading Stephen King Update #2”

Reading Stephen King Update #1

Since I posted the list in June of novels I’ve read by Stephen King I’ve managed to read another 4: Finders Keepers, Duma Key, Lisey’s Story, and The Bazaar of Bad Dreams. Not as much as I’d hoped, and I fell short of my challenge to read 1 SK novel per month last year. Still, it means I’ve got plenty left to work though!

Any recommendations on which one to read next? Continue reading “Reading Stephen King Update #1”

Joyland by Stephen King

joyland-illustrated-editionI read Joyland when it came out in 2013, and have since re-read it twice more, most recently for the new Illustrated Edition that has been released. Not one to miss an opportunity to shout about a book I love, I’ve reviewed the novel over at SFFWorld – check it out.

Joyland by Stephen King was released in 2013 by Hard Case Crime as a paperback exclusive, yet has gone on to spawn many different editions. A brief search will turn up the original publication plus an ebook, audiobook, limited hardback, and this latest illustrated hardback edition. I’ve read Joyland three times now, and while the audiobook is an excellent narration of this story, it’s this release that is the defining version of Joyland.

Joyland is an exceptional novel. Not only does King deliver an interesting murder-mystery that will keep you guessing, but does so without it obviously being one. It’s often heartfelt and emotional, with relationships playing a large part throughout, and never is it a chore to read. Perhaps one of King’s best novels in recent memory, Joyland is a slow-burner that will not let you down.

Reading Stephen King

I enjoy reading Stephen King’s novels, though I have read such a small percentage of his published works. In an effort to resolve this glaring oversight I decided to start tracking the novels and collections of his that I’ve read, hence the below list. Some of his novels I read in my youth and early twenties, but I’d like to try and re-read those, as well as making progress on the novels that I have yet to even look at. I’ve got years of reading ahead of me, even at my goal of one book per month. Slowly but surely, I’ll get there! Continue reading “Reading Stephen King”

The Wind Through The Keyhole by Stephen King

The Wind Through The Keyhole is the eighth Dark Tower novel from Stephen King, though events contained within places it as book 4.5 in the series. When it was announced that King was writing a new Dark Tower installment I was cautiously optimistic, wondering just how he was going to slip in another volume to an already finished series, especially with it placing halfway through. The Wind Through The Keyhole was always going to be on my to-read list, especially with the series as a whole amongst my favourites. A story within a story, The Wind Through The Keyhole is an interesting book. It’s not long, and with two tales in a short page count it does remarkably well. Continue reading “The Wind Through The Keyhole by Stephen King”

The Waste Lands by Stephen King

Roland, the Last Gunslinger, is moving ever closer to the Dark Tower, which haunts his dreams and nightmares. Pursued by the Ageless Stranger, he and his friends follow the perilous path to Lud, an urban wasteland. And crossing a desert of damnation in this macabre new world, revelations begin to unfold about who – and what – is driving him forward.

A blend of riveting action and powerful drama, The Waste Lands leaves readers breathlessly awaiting the next chapter.

And the Tower is closer…
Continue reading “The Waste Lands by Stephen King”

The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King

Roland of Gilead, the Last Gunslinger, encounters three doors which open to 1980s America, where he joins forces with the defiant Eddie Dean and courageous, volatile Odetta Holmes. And confronts deadly serial killer Jack Mort.

As the titanic forces gather, a savage struggle between underworld evil and otherworldly enemies conspire to bring an end to Roland’s quest for the Dark Tower…

Masterfully weaving dark fantasy and icy realism, THE DRAWING OF THE THREE compulsively propels readers toward the next chapter.

And the Tower is closer…
Continue reading “The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King”

The Gunslinger by Stephen King

In THE GUNSLINGER, Stephen King introduces readers to one of his most enigmatic heroes, Roland of Gilead, the Last Gunslinger. He is a haunting figure, a loner, on a spellbinding journey into good and evil, in a desolate world which frighteningly echoes our own.

In his first step towards the powerful and mysterious Dark Tower, Roland encounters an alluring woman named Alice, begins a friendship with Jake, a kid from New York, and faces an agonising choice between damnation and salvation as he pursues the Man in Black.

Both grippingly realistic and eerily dreamlike, THE GUNSLINGER leaves readers eagerly awaiting the next chapter.

And the Tower is closer…
Continue reading “The Gunslinger by Stephen King”